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Below are the 20 most recent journal entries recorded in Keith Palmer's LiveJournal:

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Monday, June 27th, 2016
6:27 pm
From the Bookshelf: The Complete Peanuts 1999-2000
The "next volume preview" at the back of what I'd supposed the penultimate volume of The Complete Peanuts surprised me a bit by putting Sally on the cover of the collection to come. Some years ago I had seen a seemingly official anticipation on all the cover characters that had said the series would end with Charlie Brown, as it had begun and as it had included a Charlie Brown from each decade, and so far as I can remember the list had seemed accurate up to that point. Some months after that, though, I saw an explanation of sorts in that plans now included a twenty-sixth volume featuring "comics and stories," things Charles M. Schulz had drawn outside of the regular strips. This, of course, would mean an even number of volumes in the series and the opportunity to put the actual final days of the strip in one more consistent-sized boxed set. In the piece I saw the explanation in, though, there was also the comment the introduction to the last regular volume would be by President Obama, and that was in a strange way reassuring. I did wonder all over again about what I'd heard of Schulz's personal politics for all that he'd seemed to have kept them out of the strip (in a collection of interviews with him I once bought, a wide-ranging late interview included him remembering how depressed he'd been when Dewey hadn't defeated Truman after all and criticising Bill Clinton's policies, even if Clinton has provided a back-cover quote for the last several volumes, and in an earlier interview he had been contacted by people associated with Adlai Stevenson's 1956 campaign, supposing anyone writing such an "intellectual" strip would surely support that candidate; Schulz had to turn them down and explain he was an "Eisenhower Republican"), but I could suppose that no matter how careful Obama would be in his comments (his introduction wound up just one page long, and that included the usual page-wide graphic at the top) he wouldn't cluck and sigh that Schulz could have enjoyed his retirement and maintained the respect of those whose opinion counted (just like the commentator's) by having quit long before. Now, I just had to see what my own opinion would be.
"Dear Harry Potter, I am your biggest fan."Collapse )

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/262695.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Tuesday, June 21st, 2016
5:23 pm
From the (Library) Bookshelf: The Martian
After seeing The Martian at the movies last year, I did contemplate reading the novel it had been adapted from. Whenever I saw it at the bookstore, though, I never quite got around to buying a copy. It took seeing it at the library before I resolved to sign it out.

I have to mention the bad news first, though, that there's a moment in the book where a minor character throws in the gratuitous comment that he only wants "Star Wars original trilogy" memorabilia in exchange for a feat of programming. That events have already cast an ever so slightly different light on that didn't help much, and it gets harder every time I see something like that to respect that other people may have been less willing to enforce positivity than I was and am, and easier to just suspect a lazy bundle of reactions to pop culture taking over; somehow, it even casts a shadow over the story-long joke that Mark Watney is stranded with nothing but 1970s TV shows and disco music to occupy himself in between having to stay alive.

However, the book didn't get around to editorializing how it was only possible to send people to Mars by rejecting the official plans from around the time it was being written, which might have been the larger part of what had kept me leery about reading it even after the movie hadn't concluded with genius private inventors rescuing incompetent government employees. As well, I'd already known the novel contained a number of crises to be overcome later on in the story that the movie hadn't included. At one point, Watney accidentally burns out the replacement radio he had re-established contact with Earth with; I got to remembering that part of the movie and wondering if it still ought to be interpreted that way. A somewhat later scene where he's driving his rover into a dust storm everyone but him knows about did set up an interesting and somehow different challenge. In all, though, it does have me remembering the movie is now available for streaming on Netflix and wondering if I'll be able to find or make the time to watch it again.

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/262497.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Tuesday, June 14th, 2016
8:01 pm
A Titanic Monopoly
I've thought of a few reasons why I might have stayed interested in anime for so many years compared to at least some other people. Of late, though, I've started to wonder if I stay interested in it where I don't tend to watch or read "live-action" and "domestic" properties others take a "fannish" interest in because that interest is tied up with a certain few attitudes and judgments that grate on me. That, in turn, did make me wonder if it's for my personal best that anime keeps seeming to fly under that high-powered radar...

Today, though, I happened to see the latest in the endless stream of "licensed Monopoly versions" just happens to be an Attack on Titan game, and that did amuse me even as I once more remembered the days "properties" got original board games made up for them and peered at the image attached to try and answer that all-important question as to what the least and most expensive game properties are (the game is putting the anime's characters on them). The apparent demonstration "crossover appeal" has lasted for at least a while is interesting. However, I did begin searching on a vague whim to see there's been a "Pokemon Monopoly" already; it may be a bit much to try and make this particular instant a "we have arrived" moment.

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/262250.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Saturday, June 11th, 2016
1:47 pm
From the Bookshelf: Legends of the Galactic Heroes: Dawn
When I joined my university's anime club, more than a few years ago now, members in the know were talking up a series called Legend of the Galactic Heroes. By the time I graduated, the club had started showing the series "fansubbed," and I did find its austere military-political space opera set to classical music interesting. In the years that followed I learned more about the series, but the sense did also build the time when it might have been licensed for an official release over here had passed; even its invocation as a way of showing just how refined your tastes were, or how much better anime had been once upon a time, seemed to fade away.

Then, all of a sudden it was announced the series had been licensed at last; what was more, another announcement declared the first of the novels the anime had been adapted from were to be translated. The conditional nature of "first" did lead to some dark suspicions that would be all we'd get, but as we keep waiting for the anime to show up the very first novel has been released. I did take longer than some to get around to reading it, but I have now read it.
Thinking back, looking aheadCollapse )

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/262014.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Sunday, June 5th, 2016
6:38 pm
Found at the Fair
Back when I commented on the Mystery Science Theater 3000 episode "The Rebel Set," I mentioned how I'd heard of a recent follow-up to that episode's short, "Johnny at the Fair," without being able to see it. With that said, I more or less put it out of my mind. Just a few days ago, though, when taking a look at the "Satellite News" site I saw a short notice the video "Charlie at the Fair" had been found on YouTube, and took it in at last.

It turned out the little boy who played "Johnny" grew up to become a Canadian artist of some note; Charles Pachter suggested this hadn't just been a coincidence for him through two weeks of filming at "The Ex" imprinting a sense of "Canada being amazing" on him. (So far as that perhaps having been a little unusual for people his exact age, all the flags flying in the period short are Union Jacks; things hadn't even worked up to the "Red Ensign" yet.) As with some of the extra features on the official Mystery Science Theater DVDs, the short just happening to wind up being included in the MST3K canon isn't mentioned; however, the show never aired on cable up here so I was willing to let that go. One person commenting on the short in the video did bring up the "Chemical Wonderland" MST3K had some fun with. The bits of the short excerpted in the video, though, caught my attention for having different music (the music in the "MST3K version" seemed to be stock material; it can be heard in some of the other shorts the show featured...) and a different narrator (Lorne Greene, still a few years away from moving south to become a television patriarch). Hearing the short had originally been a National Film Board of Canada production had me wondering if it might be available for streaming on their own site; when it didn't turn up there I turned to YouTube, and it turned out it was there alongside the MST3K version, which did have rather more views.

While I've admitted to not quite having the courage to tackle many movies from the MST3K canon "raw," I was willing to make an exception; I soon had the impression that whoever had made up the short that had wound up an "ephemeral film" had been supplied with footage from the National Film Board and had cut it together in a slightly different way, even managing to include a few moments from the cutting room floor. The anonymous narration might been a little less serious and involved than Lorne Greene's, but perhaps that just added to the potential for Mystery Science Theater.

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/261769.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Friday, June 3rd, 2016
6:57 pm
Crosspost Update: to June 3
Without much fuss, I managed to drift out of the habit of regularly posting links to Tumblr posts I've made here to "keep up for when I need to do that"; however, that doesn't mean I haven't given up all thoughts of that quick source of content. So far as posting computer magazine covers goes, I've worked well into 1978 by now; the initial announcements of 1977's "preassembled" microcomputers have given way to actual user reports. I also happened to think a particular feature in Creative Computing could stand on its own; by the time I'd thought that, though, I had to put three "Computer Myths Explained" together.

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/261461.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Sunday, May 29th, 2016
6:43 pm
Collected at last
During the season of Lent, I decided I'd been spending an awful lot of my lunch breaks playing a particular game on my iPad (the number-matching game Threes), and resolved to give it up for at least a while. I might hewed to the letter of that pledge while still missing its spirit, however. Having just finished watching the anime series Love Live, I thought I could try out the mobile game in the franchise; once I'd done that, I realised just how effectively it could pull someone in.
An illustration of thatCollapse )

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/261172.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Thursday, May 26th, 2016
6:18 pm
Completed Collection Thoughts: MST3K XXXV
The back of the latest official Mystery Science Theater 3000 DVD collection is already anticipating the new series. Until then, and however it turns out (I'm still concerned "using cheesy movies as an excuse to put down familiar targets" will be all too easy for the new creators to fall into), I can keep revisiting episodes I've seen before. I can be conscious that these days I use the time in between the collections for other things, but the whole deal with not necessarily going back to the same "favourites" all the time has something to it too. I'm also conscious, though, that as much I'd like to keep finding new things in existing works, the possibility of "wearing them out" also exists.

I started off with "Teenage Caveman" and its accompanying shorts, one rather more infamous than the other. The movie itself was hokily entertaining (even if I did have a sense of just how many possible digressions drag out its rather brief running time), and there was a little documentary about it too. "Being From Another Planet" dragged me up to the 1980s (and the tag-end of the "ancient astronaut" craze, even if this was at least different from the conspiracy narratives that swallowed all the imaginative potential of "flying saucers" and congealed into something fixed as the decade wore on). There have been times I fear this episode drags by for me, but this time I was at least taking particular notice of an early-1980s home computer playing a role in the movie. Along with a brief interview with the film's composer, there's a considerable extra feature in the original "Time Walker" movie (in widescreen, no less) Film Ventures International slapped its cheap credits sequences and new name on, but there I do have to face a certain reluctance to take on most of the MST3K films "raw," such that these biggest of all possible extras sort of deflate down to nothing.

In wondering about "Being From Another Planet" dragging for me, I can get to wondering about how others might be ready to downplay "12 to the Moon," at least once its short is past, where I had sort of played it up getting to the end of commenting on all of MST3K's episodes. I did seem to have a pretty good time with it still, though, and the little documentary about the movie made a point or two about some of the good work its crew had done before (even as it didn't mention the moments Mystery Science Theater was quicker to point out...) "Deathstalker and the Warriors From Hell," in any case, seems a general favourite, and there was plenty to enjoy in its medieval-yet-1980s antics. The extra for this episode was an interview with Thom Christopher, who played the villain as distinctively as anything else in the movie. He seemed pretty content with suggesting everyone had known just how "cheesy" things were turning out but were enjoying themselves anyway.

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/260936.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Thursday, May 19th, 2016
5:15 pm
Prequel Appreciation Day: "10 Things I Like"

Being invited to mark the shared anniversary of two of the Star Wars movies by coming up with "ten things I like about the prequels" was invigorating, but also challenging. By this point my appreciation of them is pretty far-ranging; the trick was narrowing it down to a few things I could share some hopefully well-chosen words about. With thought, though, I formed a list, and then a list I could and had to pick and choose from. As I did so, I did have to face insisting it isn't a "top ten" list; to say something about the major characters might mean saying a lot, much of which may have been picked up from others. Instead, I hope this is more a personal but wide-ranging summary.

An illustrated summary, tooCollapse )

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/260829.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Thursday, May 12th, 2016
8:01 pm
Crosspost Update: to May 12
I spent this weekend working on replacing the tiles on my kitchen floor, which threw off my schedule for keeping up a minimal presence on this journal by mentioning just what computer magazine covers I've been posting elsewhere online. However, in the posts I've piled up I managed to include a good bit of introductory coverage of the TRS-80...

Kilobaud, September 1977
BYTE, September 1977
Creative Computing, September-October 1977
Kilobaud, October 1977
BYTE, October 1977
Personal Computing, November-December 1977
ROM, November 1977
Kilobaud, November 1977
BYTE, November 1977

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/260377.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Saturday, May 7th, 2016
7:55 am
Repeated Accomplishment
I knew SpaceX was planning to launch another Falcon 9 rocket, and that another attempt would be made to land the first stage on a barge out at sea, but I had the impression the chances for another success still weren't high. At work yesterday, though, a slug of text on the information-cluttered screen of a local cable news channel reported the landing had happened, and at night no less. That this has been done twice in a row is impressive, but I do wonder about whether "making things look easy" will start to clash against those reported odds against success. I also wonder how long it could be before we find out how much work is needed to refurbish a first stage for use again, knowing how much work the space shuttle orbiters wound up needing (although it's possible they were more complicated machines).

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/260180.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Wednesday, May 4th, 2016
6:48 pm
In the Nick of Time
Today's of course the day people start saying "May the Fourth be with you" to each other with a wink and a nudge. Both the morning and the afternoon radio shows I listen to on the road to and from work mentioned that, but I was already in perhaps that much more of a lugubrious mood than I was a year ago.

For a brief moment just before Christmas, I managed to get over not just all the emphasis on just how much stuff had been put in front of the film cameras for The Force Awakens and the seeming code behind it but also the critical ecstasies that seemed more a matter of recycling old complaints, and articulated the careful reaction that I liked the movie more than I'd been concerned I would. Just a few hours after that, though, with an impression the latest movie hadn't been as "revisionist" as the code had made me worry I seemed to be thinking more about the other side of the saga, the crawling sense deepening the beloved heroes such a big deal had been made of their returning had just been presented as having blown the whole thing, except that we'd never quite know how because of convictions things had been cooler when Darth Vader's origins had been up to the imagination. A few months later, the trailer for Rogue One seemed very much more of the same, save that the mechanical and costume designs wouldn't have slight tweaks to them this time. As for being open-minded enough to go back to The Force Awakens looking for greater depth, hearing the special features on the Blu-Ray were making a big deal of just how much had been put in front of the film cameras in the context of ecstasies that seemed more a matter of recycling old complaints put me right back where I'd started, and in not having bought a disc yet I'm conscious of how I had bought a Blu-Ray player and a HDTV at last, and yet without really waiting for a declared sale, just so I could get to the saga Blu-Rays before it was somehow "too late."

With all of that, though, the latest announcement of "Prequel Appreciation Day" challenged me to come up with "10 favourite things." A bit of thought started bringing ideas to mind (although I can't say they're my top ten, just ten varied things). The only trick will be articulating them in the days remaining.

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/259869.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Sunday, May 1st, 2016
5:56 pm
Crosspost Update: to May 1
As I work my way into computer magazine covers from the second half of 1977 (and the Commodore PET's moment in the spotlight), I've got around to posting some of the covers I do have for a magazine that isn't online yet. After Creative Computing, Softalk, and Macworld, ROM ("Computer Applications for Living") does seem to have become the old computer magazine I'm most curious about, even if the fact it'll soon be gone from the narrative means its issues haven't been scanned yet.

ROM, July 1977
Kilobaud, July 1977
BYTE, July 1977
Creative Computing, July-August 1977
ROM, August 1977
BYTE, August 1977
Personal Computing, September-October 1977

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/259739.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Sunday, April 24th, 2016
6:35 pm
Crosspost Update: to April 24
Along with pushing that much further into the computer magazine covers of 1977 (within which initial coverage of the Apple II began to pick up), I happened to repost a possibly relevant (to another topic of personal interest, anyway) sequence of images.

Kilobaud, May 1977
BYTE, May 1977
Creative Computing, May-June 1977 (properly coloured cover)
Kilobaud, June 1977
BYTE, June 1977
Personal Computing, July-August 1977

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/259438.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Saturday, April 23rd, 2016
6:52 pm
Anime Wrap-up: Mazinger Edition Z: The Impact
In the latest of my regular "quarterly reviews" of the anime I watch, I mentioned having become quite impressed with a not-that-old updating of a vintage series. I also brought up, though, being just a little aware that "Mazinger Edition Z: The Impact" didn't seem to have been widely discussed among other fans for all that reactions to the licensing announcement had been positive enough to get my attention. Somewhere along the way, I seem to have noticed a comment or two about one of the "Super Robot War" video games, which cross over mecha anime old and new but which the English-speaking fandom has to import from Japan and play in Japanese, including that particular series but "fixing the ending." It cast a certain apprehension over the escalating stakes of the final episodes.

To try to be non-specific, the series did end in somewhat the same "setting up" fashion as the original Mazinger Z did, only this time with a rather serious cliffhanger. That there hasn't been a continuation to this date means being stuck trying to "use your imagination," and perhaps that's the problem. For an anime series to "mangle the ending" is almost a cliche when it comes to fan reactions; I've done my best to positively view some of the more infamous series accused of that, but perhaps it's a bit different when you don't sense things going in particular directions several episodes out. Even so, there can seem a trace of "giving up" to let everything seen beforehand be cancelled out in the end.

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/259175.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Monday, April 18th, 2016
5:48 pm
Crosspost Update: to April 18
I seem to have worked out a pattern for alternating between monthly and bimonthly computer magazine covers from 1977, although I suppose it'll change as other titles enter the fray. I also happened to repost a thoroughly classical arrangement...

Personal Computing, March-April 1977
Kilobaud, March 1977
BYTE, March 1977
Creative Computing, March-April 1977
Kilobaud, April 1977
BYTE, April 1977
Personal Computing, May-June 1977

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/259062.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Sunday, April 17th, 2016
11:45 am
Luck of the Draw
On my way into the once-a-month meeting of the local Apple user group meeting, I looked at the table where the raffle prizes are set out only to be hit with a sudden thrill of recognition. Among the assorted bits of hardware and envelopes with software licenses in them, I could see the iconic shape of an antique Apple II computer, complete with Apple-branded monitor and two Disk II drives. It would be a rare and unusual prize, I thought, and yet I was stuck remembering. Every paid-up member of the user group gets one raffle ticket a month, but for all that I have won a software license or two for programs I've found useful I've been very aware of sitting and watching as number after number not my own is drawn and people go up to the front of the room to claim prizes as big as old Power Macintosh G5 towers. (I've seen three of those metal-cased "cheese graters" won, although I have wondered if they were the same computer every time, returned by people who had got to wondering if they really needed another old computer.) This time, I took a picture with my iPad's camera of what I could now tell was an earlier Apple IIe to leave me at least a little proof the prize had been there.
The picture, and a bit moreCollapse )

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/258578.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Monday, April 11th, 2016
7:11 pm
Crosspost Update: to April 11
Just as I was getting under way with computer magazine covers of 1977, I managed to get sick, which threw off my schedule for a while. I seem to be on the mend now, and have at least managed to get past a surely iconic cover image and a few thoroughly austere covers from a different magazine now added to the mix.

Personal Computing, January-February 1977
Kilobaud, January 1977
BYTE, January 1977
Creative Computing, January-February 1977
Kilobaud, February 1977
BYTE, February 1977

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/258453.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Sunday, April 10th, 2016
4:42 pm
Welcome Sundays (of 1952)
Back when the comics site I follow the daily reruns of Peanuts on began rerunning the strip from the very beginning, I suppose I was thinking ahead to the moment "Peanuts Begins" has now reached, the first Sunday page. I had wondered whether it would be shown as the "regular" reruns now go with the upper-right panel left out (as it could be) to reconfigure the pages to "portrait" format, but instead we're getting the whole thing a bit less blown up. I had also wondered about the colouring of the new "Peanuts Every Sunday" collections, and the colouring of this first page matches the book's... of course, there would seem to be weeks to come yet to be compared.

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/258109.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
Saturday, April 9th, 2016
9:06 pm
One Further Horizon, Then
Not interminable limbo, then, or even that broken at last only by final dismissal, but news of another tomorrow. It is nice to hear there should be an eighth omnibus published in English of the Viking manga Vinland Saga, even with the temporizing I did at the end of the seventh that "this wouldn't be the worst place to leave off." I'll just have to wait and see where and how things go.

This entry was originally posted at http://krpalmer.dreamwidth.org/257889.html. Comment here or there (using OpenID) as you please.
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